I’m Tired of Living in a PC World

I’m tired of living in Politically Correct World.

There I said it.

I know I’ll get some backlash from people in my community for this post, but I have sat on this piece for too long.

Tensions have been high in recent LGBT news following the Great T-Word Scandal of 2014 and despite my strong opinions on the matter, I stayed away from Social Media battles relating to the issue. Because as much as I hate personal freedoms and individual rights being slammed, I hate even more the division it all causes in our very own community.

However, last week I stumbled across an article, the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back, and realized then that this post was long overdue.

The article title caught my attention right away: “‘Cards Against Humanity’ Co-Creator Publicly Apologizes for Transphobic Card”. I own the game and know well that it is intentionally rude and politically incorrect, with a tagline on the game that reads “A party game for horrible people”. The game is similar to the clean, politically correct game of Apples to Apples, where players play red cards (e.g. Lobster) in their hand to best fit a green card category (e.g. Expensive). In Cards Against Humanity, a black card is drawn and revealed that has a fill-in-blank sentence on it. Players choose a white card from their hand, cards that only have words or phrases on them, to complete the sentence. Of course the goal is to be the player to make the funniest combination – like in MadLibs. The game is not exactly everyone’s cup of tea – the kind of game some never admit to enjoy. To further prove this point, I drew one black card and one white card at random: “This is the way the world ends. This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but with: Throwing a virgin into a volcano.” Let the laughter ensue.

So, when I saw the title of the article, my first thought was, “What could possibly be so terrible in a game like that to coax an apology from one of its creators?” I mean, isn’t that the point of the game? To gather with close friends and safely laugh at horribly disgusting terms and pairings that are not well-accepted in public? Isn’t that like going to Dick’s Last Resort and complaining that the waiter was rude?

And if the article title wasn’t enough to spark my curiosity, there was this accompanying picture:

fusion.net

fusion.net

The card read “Passable transvestites.” No way could this be the card that made such a fuss. NO WAY could people be so incredibly self-involved to expect that even in a “game for horrible people” all must bend so as not to hurt feelings and stir up politically correct social anxiety. And yet, that was exactly the case.

In the article, I found out that Tumbler user “horriblewarning” (strange irony there) is the owner of the original picture. He says he and his friends were playing the game and collectively felt that this card was wrong and transphobic so they had a little fun with it. They burned it, took a few photos and posted it to Tumbler with the caption “DEATH TO TRANSPHOBIA”.

Now, to be clear, I have no real issue with horriblewarning (Jonah, 19) and his friends not liking the card. To me, everyone has a right to an opinion, and if that was there’s, fine. I even have just a mild annoyance at the dramatic post online, but this is the Age of Social Media after all.

My problem is with the insane angry-mob-like reaction the post received. All of a sudden, the post was spreading like wildfire as users screamed for justice and apologies for the “transphobic card”. Are these people serious? Do you honestly expect to sweep the world and remove any politically incorrect humor in existence? Should I call up Joan Rivers and let her know that her comedy will no longer be allowed on this planet? Should we gather up every “A priest and rabbi walk into a bar” joke and ensure that they never again see the light of day?

And let’s focus on the card, once more, shall we? “Passable Transvestites”. If the LGBT community (or whomever) is really all that pissed about this card, how about a vocabulary lesson: Transvestite means any person who is dressing like a member of the opposite sex or gender, typically for emotional or sexual satisfaction. The terms Transgender or Transsexual are not interchangeable with Transvestite.

And this is my point – because of all of the uproar about transphobic slurs and the use of the word “Tranny” and the “She-Male” game on RuPaul’s Drag Race, we are too sensitive. We can’t even see a play on words as funny anymore (“Ooh, Girl. You’ve got She-Mail”). Is it really true that after all of these years fighting for LGBT rights, we want to pick a fight over words? This weekend marks the 45th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York City. Every year, we celebrate the progress we’ve made and look to further that progress. In the last few months, that progress has felt slow to me, as more and more members of my community turn on each other, on allies, on artists, and on the future. How is it that we have decided that policing others’ individual rights is more important than fighting for our own?

The truth is, there will always be things that offend us – some more than others. If we are able to deal with those offenses on a small, one-on-one basis, there will be no need for massive public slayings of people who seem to have mis-stepped. Being the community that needs a red carpet laid out across a politically correct universe seems a little silly coming from a group of people that started as outcasts and rebels, don’t you think?

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10 Reasons Why Drag Queens Make the World a Better Place

The Incomparable Jinkx Monsoon*

The Incomparable Jinkx Monsoon*

10. Entertainment – The job of a Drag Queen is first and foremost to entertain. If you were to speak to any Drag Queen about why they do what they do, I’m certain they’d all have their own reasons. Each Queen has a story that made them who they are today, both in and out of drag. But at the heart of each is an entertainer. That pure joy you see as you watch a Queen on stage, putting her heart into whatever her craft has led her to do, is something that can put a smile on any face. That is life-saving “entertaintment”.

Brittany Lynn phillymag.com

Brittany Lynn
phillymag.com

9. Commitment – A Queen’s closet is no joke. She has wigs and shoes and lashes for days – or years rather. And clothing isn’t all she has in her repertoire. So many Drag Queens can do multiple impersonations. Some can sing. Many do comedy. That kind of commitment seems like it’s fewer and farther between these days.

8. Fashion – Queens have style! And I don’t necessarily mean the what’s-hot-and-what’s-not kind of style. Fashion doesn’t always have to be dictated by magazines. I just mean polished and proud of how they look. It’s an impressive feat to look so on-point as a boy and smokin’ hot a girl.

Jessica Wild as both Bride and Groom in the wedding challenge on RuPaul's Drag Race Season 2.

Jessica Wild as both Bride and Groom in the wedding challenge on RuPaul’s Drag Race Season 2.

7. Creativity – The Drag World is a culture rich in unique creativity. Not only do Drag Queens have their own lingo (one that makes little sense to the uninitiated), but they are even bringing their artistic influences to the music world these days. There’s songs like RuPaul’s “Tranny Chaser” and Sharon Needles’ “Kai Kai” that even poke fun at their own culture. You can find campy craziness in Alaska’s “Nails“, with the chanted lyric, “If you’re not wearing nails, then you’re not doing drag!” My favorites are the parodies of popular songs. Willam Belli’s “Chow Down (at Chick Fil-A)” featuring Detox and Vicky Vox remakes Wilson Phillips’ “Hold On (For One More Day)”. The trio recently collaborated on another creation in “Blurred Bynes“, a hilarious montage throwing shade at Amanda Bynes and her not-so-mature antics. And a must-hear is Mimi Imfurst as she sings her parody of “I Will Survive” entitled “Another Lie“, referring to the “tiny” fib told by a male about the [desired] size of his nether regions. 😉

Alaska Thunderf#%$ 5000, Star and runner-up of RuPaul’s Drag Race Season 5

6. Cajones – And I don’t mean actual testicles (although they have those, too). I mean courage. It takes more courage than many could fathom for a man to dress in women’s clothing and parade around in public. Many Queens share stories about the first time they dressed in drag and how liberating it felt. But the world, as accepting as it’s becoming, is still a scary place. Bigotry and hate threaten that liberation each time a Queen steps out her door. Seeing their courage can give us all hope.

5. Beauty – What fascinates me most about Drag Queens is the illusion. I can’t get enough of watching the Boy turn into the Queen. To me, it’s Beauty in such a true form. When I put on make-up and do my hair, I may spend about 20 minutes on the whole project. To watch what a Drag Queen must do to become the women within is breathtaking. It’s not an easy Beauty. It isn’t effortless. It’s laborious. It takes time. It takes energy. And at the end of it all, each Queen is on display for critique and judgement. And yet it’s the Beauty and the Labor that keeps her coming back to the high of being in Drag. It is, without a doubt, truly beautiful.

Maddelynne Hatter in Leland Bobbe's Half-Drag portraits project.

Maddelynne Hatter in Leland Bobbe’s Half-Drag portraits project.

4. Fear – With every act of bravery comes a little bit of fear. Sometimes when we recognize a fear within ourselves, we are embarrassed by it. We try and bury the fear, cover it up, ignore it. But when we see acts of bravery overcome fear, it gives us a glimmer of reality. We begin to recognize that everyone has fear – even the coolest, calmest, bravest of heroes. Fear is real. A Drag Queen may put on wigs and layers of makeup and 6-inch heels, but underneath it all there is a little bit of fear that reminds us that they are real.

3. Defiance – What’s a Drag Queen without a healthy dose of Bad Kid? Just the definition of Drag Queen proves that they don’t follow the straight path dictated by the squares of society. That alone makes me green with envy – throw a lace front wig and couture dress on top of that and I can say that I am officially jealous of Drag Queens.

2. Patience – The art of drag definitely doesn’t come easily. To give you an idea of what a Drag Queen does to get ready I included a video below titled “Drag Becomes Him”. The video is of my all-time favorite Queen, Jinkx Monsoon. She is querky and bizarre and silly. As a boy, she has wild red hair and a goofy laugh. As she transforms herself into Jinkx she becomes her and the boy just melts away. It takes a special kind of patience – but what an amazing reward.

1. Inspiration – And finally, the number one reason why Drag Queens make this world a better place – INSPIRATION. Even if a large part of the world doesn’t want to accept Gays and Gay Culture, we’re here. There are countless adolescents out there struggling with their sexuality and where they fit in. Somewhere, there’s an awkward gay boy that has a picture of Jinkx Monsoon in his school notebook and uses it each day as a promise of a better future. Maybe he’s from a small town, maybe from a big city. Either way, he needs someone to show him that being different and being gay and being fabulous are not things to be ashamed of. And maybe someday he’ll be able to express his own creativity in an equally fabulous way – because Drag. Queens. Rule.

*The Featured image for this post is of Jinkx Monsoon starring with Major Scales in “The Vaudevillians” at the Laurie Beechman Theatre in New York City. It is an incredible show and a must-see! Get tickets here! But do it soon – after November 19 she takes the show on an international tour!